Shankill Smartphoneography

October 28, 2017  •  Leave a Comment

Friday was a fab late autumn day in Shankill but I was running around doing bits and pieces with no time for shooting . . . forgetting the fine camera in my iPhone SE! So, I took a few minutes to capture some shots along the Main Street of my adopted village. As I’m writing articles  about smartphoneography , I should really practice what I preach!! And yes, I just made up smartphoneography and I was feeling rather pleased with myself – although though it sounds a bit fake if you pronounce the e! Nonetheless, as I wrote this I was looking forward to taking my place amongst the world’s neologismists? egologismists? . . . whatever! But,  before I got too carried away with myself,  I thought I should google it – and damn I’m not the first to think of it! it’s even a Twitter hashtag!! Oh well, back to the photography.

Setting the scene, here’s a HDR shot using the native phone app – as I did for all of these shots. I dickeyed it up a bit using the automatic enhancement​​​​​​ editing feature in the native Photos app.

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The shot of the main street was also HDR, again with automatic enhancement to bring out the colour of the sky – I just waited for the bus to add a bit of interest to the road.

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I didn’t have time to walk up to St. Anne’s Church, so I took a “small building big sky” approach by doing a vertical phone panorama. In Snapseed, I used the “pop” pre-set and then the brush feature to darken the bottom of the shot as the church was a bit over exposed.

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Next is a group of autumn leaves looking over the railway bridge that once straddled the old Harcourt Street line – I liked the combination of the dark background with the additional leaves in the backgrounds. Editing was minimal with – automatic enhancement with a touch of “brilliance” added.

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Finally, they say the shadow of the photographer should never appear in the shot . . .! Anyway, it’s clear that modern smartphones can take technically good shots in good light – especially if you work on angle, position and framing. As the reader, you will have to decide if you like them!

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